Blog Archives

Talking Issues: Industry of Tourism

by : Mohammed Abdullah
Email: moabd31@yahoo.com

Sudan was gifted by all types of tourism factors such as long beaches, beautiful landscapes, good nature and archeological sites in different parts of the country.
Tourism has become an important industry nowadays and it contributes and brings a huge amount of money to increase the public revenue of countries. The problem that faces tourism in Sudan is the absence of a set plan, tourists’ needs in, how to attract them and types of laws that should be made?
Tourism will bring hard currency and open Sudan to the world.
The plan must address foreigners; this mean that we need to deal with different cultures, traditions and habits.
Archeologists have to convey ancient areas and to inform tourists about Sudan, its history, food and all interesting aspects related to tourism.
The Minister of Investment in Sudan has prepared an investment plan which targeted all states and each of them submitted a proposal about the type of tourism it will present. On behalf of the country, the ministry of investment will present to the market of tourism laws to regulate tourism investment.
The country needs to facilitate the mission of investors and encourage them through flexible legislations.
It is not difficult to create a good atmosphere and offer tourism services based on international criteria. However, this dream has been translated into action by Al-Saraf Tourism Complex, a national company managed to penetrate the world of tourism through a Sudanese restaurant called Al-Housh. This complex was designed to receive ambassadors, international organizations and all foreigners from different parts of the world. The restaurant has an international staff, which is well trained to serve people of multi-cultures.
Those who stand behind the idea managed to create an attractive, breath taking Nile beach in Omdurman.
The Sudanese government appreciated the idea and promised to encourage national investors and to host guests to establish businesses in Sudan.

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by : Mohammed Abdullah
Email: moabd31@yahoo.com

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Al Housh Resturant & Cafe |

Thomas Klein International (TKI), the Dubai-based food and beverage consultants, recently announced the opening of Al Housh located in Khartoum, Sudan.

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The eatery, featuring 25 stalls selling food and fresh produce and a seating capacity for 600 people, forms part of the El Seref Tourism and Hospitality project, and is the largest outlet located within the 45,000 square feet destination.

“Al Housh offers traditional Sudanese cuisine, and recreates a souk layout and experience whereby customers are brought back to a time and place when the ingredients were at the core of the food they ate,” explains Daniel During, Principal and Managing Director of Thomas Klein International.

“Similarly, the interior design was inspired by the ancient street markets and souks, and we have created similar courtyards and alleys throughout the eatery, to create an authentic dining experience.”

The food and beverage concept was designed after scouring the country to learn about traditional cooking methods, recipes and ingredients.

“We visited every hook and cranny in every souk, every street and stall and spoke to many locals about the Sudanese food and their ways of eating.”

“After months of unrelenting research and education, it all became clear. This amazing food, and culinary traditions, along with the ancient recipes and cooking methods where all hidden in back allies in a huge city, accessible only to the male population, unreachable to women and children and families.”

“We needed to frame this proud heritage and make it available to the wider public and expose it to the world. We needed to showcase Sudanese traditions in a way that would make the Sudanese proud of what their land has to offer. Most of all, we were inspired to create a place that would appeal to Sudanese families and foreigners alike.”

TKI worked with several local and international companies to replicate the ancient Sudanese cooking methods while meeting modern standards of food quality, hygiene and safety. El Seref also has its own on-site slaughterhouse and butchery, as well as a fishmonger. Local breads are baked on site, and most vegetables and herbs are sourced locally.

The main focus was to create a buzzing, dynamic food hall/market concept, rich in sights and sounds, that truly celebrates the native cooking of Sudan. The restaurant features 25 different food stalls, including a spice market, fruit and vegetable market, a deli, bakery, pastry shop, as well as a butcher and fishmonger and traditional street food stalls.

“We also have many live cooking stalls to showcase a host of traditional methods of cooking such as Agashe – a western Sudanese method of grilling meat, whereby the meat and chicken is placed on sticks nestled in the sand around charcoal in a circle.

“There is also the Sudanese Wok and a Salat – a typical Sudanese grilling method whereby hot charcoal is placed in a sand hole and covered with pebbles on which marinated meat slices are cooked,” said During.

Al Housh also offers customers the option to buy fresh produce and ingredients, as well as hot dishes, from the various stalls, complete with expert advice. Diners can order from the stalls or from the menu, and dine in the restaurant or take their freshly-cooked meal home.

“Ultimately, the freshness of the food is very important to the entire concept, and diners are encouraged to watch their food being prepared at the stalls, thereby enjoying the action and traditional skills of the experts,” added During.

Thomas Klein International worked closely with Iskan, a Khartoum-based design company, for the design of Al Housh, which is owned by El Seref Tourism and Hospitality

Ecotourism vs. Sustainable Tourism

Areas of Expertise, Economic Growth, Environment & NRM by kgenereux

Photo credit: Sustainable Futures

980 million people traveled internationally in 2010, a 4% increase over the previous year, and forecasts expect 1.6 billion tourists by the year 2020. Travel & Tourism as a sector accounts for 258 million jobs globally, and provides crucial opportunities for investment, economic growth, and fostering cultural awareness.  Tourism can also be a powerful tool for tackling major challenges such as conservation and poverty alleviation.

But how do environmentally and socially conscious travelers navigate the complex differences between ecotourism, sustainable tourism, socially responsible tourism and the other myriad forms of traveling responsibly?

Ecotourism vs Sustainable Tourism

Industry consensus agrees ecotourism is more focused on ecological conservation and educating travelers on local environments and natural surroundings, whereas sustainable tourism focuses on travel that has minimal impact on the environment and local communities. Ecotourism is a form of tourism, or a category of vacation similar to beach, adventure, health, or cultural, while the concept of sustainability can be applied to all types of tourism.

As established by The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) in 1990, ecotourism is “Responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” Another widely cited definition of ecotourism is “purposeful travel to natural areas to understand the culture and natural history of the environment; taking care not to alter the integrity of the ecosystem; producing economic opportunities that make the conservation of natural resources beneficial to local people.”

The Global Sustainable Tourism Council (GSTC) is a global initiative dedicated to promoting sustainable tourism practices around the world. GSTC and its global members of UN agencies, global travel companies, hotels, tourism boards and tour operators follow the Global Sustainable Tourism Criteria. The 23 criteria focus on best practices to sustain natural and cultural resources, maximize social and economic benefits for the local community, and minimize negative impacts to the environment.

Currently there is no internationally accredited body charged with overseeing the standards, monitoring and assessment, or certification for the ecotourism or sustainable tourism industries. Without an established standard it is easy to be confused by organizations that greenwash services and offerings as “environmentally friendly.” Others argue that ecotourism is an oxymoron, as travel implicitly entails activities that are detrimental to the environment. Planes, trains and automobiles use harmful fossil fuels that emit CO2, and forestland is often cleared for roads and railways.

Ecotourism and Sustainable Tourism in Action

Photo Credit: Visit Costa Rica

Costa Rica was a pioneer in ecotourism and exemplifies how tourism can be a key pillar of economic development policy. Costa Rica is now the premiere destination for ecotourism, and in 2010 tourism contributed 5.5% of the country’s GDP. Jordan serves as another model of successfully integrating conservation and socio-economic development. Ecotourism generated $2.1 million in 2010, and Jordan’s Royal Society for the Conservation of Nature has received several global awards for its success in alleviating poverty and creating employment for local communities, in combination with integrating nature conservation.

Myriad sites offer options for tours and hotels that cater to a more environmentally friendly and sustainable type of traveling experience. The New York Times travel section allows viewers to search potential destinations using ecotourism as a criteria, and Condé Nast Traveler highlights Ecotourism and Sustainable Travel under Expert Travel Tips.

The Earthwatch Institute, organizes trips where travelers work alongside scientists and explorers on field expeditions and Sierra Club’s travel arm Sierra Club Outing allows environmentalist to learn something on vacation and inflict minimal harm on the surrounding environment.

At the industry level, hotels and resorts are taking on sustainability commitments that focus on recycling, decreasing water and energy usage, reducing greenhouse gas emissions,and environmentally friendly design. Many in the industry show a commitment to a holistic approach to sustainability which includes  the construction of Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) certified buildings, providing eco-friendly and organic food and wine selections, and rewarding guests who make “green choices.” Marriott, which boasts 2,800 hotels worldwide, offers guests hotel points or vouchers for the hotel restaurant should they choose to not having linens and towels washed daily.

Understanding the difference between sustainable tourism and ecotourism educates travelers on the significant impact their travel decisions have on the environment, economy and local communities they visit. Participating in sustainable tourism, or more specifically ecotourism vacations, means travelers can contribute to development and conservation efforts, while enjoying themselves on vacation.

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Industry of Tourism ” Sudan”

Sudan was gifted by all types of tourism factors such as long beaches, beautiful landscapes, good nature and archeological sites in different parts of the country.
Tourism has become an important industry nowadays and it contributes and brings a huge amount of money to increase the public revenue of countries. The problem that faces tourism in Sudan is the absence of a set plan, tourists’ needs in, how to attract them and types of laws that should be made?
Tourism will bring hard currency and open Sudan to the world.
The plan must address foreigners; this mean that we need to deal with different cultures, traditions and habits.
Archeologists have to convey ancient areas and to inform tourists about Sudan, its history, food and all interesting aspects related to tourism.
The Minister of Investment in Sudan has prepared an investment plan which targeted all states and each of them submitted a proposal about the type of tourism it will present. On behalf of the country, the ministry of investment will present to the market of tourism laws to regulate tourism investment.
The country needs to facilitate the mission of investors and encourage them through flexible legislations.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It is not difficult to create a good atmosphere and offer tourism services based on international criteria. However, this dream has been translated into action by Al-Saraf Tourism Complex, a national company managed to penetrate the world of tourism through a Sudanese restaurant called Al-Housh. This complex was designed to receive ambassadors, international organizations and all foreigners from different parts of the world. The restaurant has an international staff, which is well trained to serve people of multi-cultures.

Those who stand behind the idea managed to create an attractive, breath taking Nile beach in Omdurman.
The Sudanese government appreciated the idea and promised to encourage national investors and to host guests to establish businesses in Sudan.

The Blue Nile and White Nile

The two major tributaries of the Nile River are the Blue Nile and White Nile. The striking difference between them is their color. The Blue Nile, which begins in the mountains of Ethiopia, starts off with a bright blue color. As it passes through Sudan, however, it picks up black sediment that gives it a darker hue. The White Nile, which begins in the forests of Rwanda and flows through Lake Victoria, is a whitish-gray color, due to the light gray sediment it carries. Although the White Nile is longer than the Blue Nile, the Blue Nile carries around two-thirds of the Nile’s water supply. The two Nile tributaries join together near the city of Khartoum, and when the Nile River reaches Egypt, it divides into two branches, known as the Damietta on the right and the Rosetta on the left, which empty into the Mediterranean Sea.

 

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Scuba Diving in the Red Sea

 

Scuba Diving in the Red Sea – Sudan is a popular water sport for those looking to explore the waters of the historic Red Sea. The untouched reefs, beautiful corals and abundant undersea life make for a perfect dive whether you are going in for a day dive or a night dive.

 

Location

 

Scuba Diving in the Red Sea – Sudan kicks off at Port Sudan. There are dive spots in the northern parts of Port Sudan as well as in its southern parts but most divers and dive operators go down the northern dive spots as this is where most of the interesting dive spots are located.

 

Port Sudan is within the Red Sea State.

 

Getting There

 

You can fly in via the Khartoum Airport or the international airport in Port Sudan, although international flights at the Port Sudan airport are limited. From the airport in Khartoum, you can get a car hire service which will take you directly to Port Sudan for your scuba diving in the Red Sea – Sudan adventure and there here is a major thoroughfare that links Khartoum to Port Sudan.

 

What to See

 

Scuba Diving in the Red Sea – Sudan, there is plenty to see and explore. Famous reefs such as the Shaab Rumi, Sanganeb and Angarosh give you excellent opportunities for viewing hammerhead sharks, tiger sharks, oceanic sharks, grey reef sharks and even thresher sharks.

 

There are also schools of humphead parrot fish plus plenty of other small fishes swimming about.

 

There is also the wreck of Umbria, the Blue Belt wreck and Jacques Cousteau underwater habitat.

 

Brief History

 

It was Hans Haas who first discovered the wreck of Umbria down in Sudan’s part of the Red Sea back in the late ‘40s. Scuba Diving in the Red Sea – Sudan became a popular water sports ever since this first discovery of the wreck.

 

Diving in the Red Sea via Port Sudan is more pleasurable to most people as the dive sites are not as crowded as compared to other dive sites in the world.

 

You can enjoy your diving expedition relatively unhampered by other divers giving you more freedom to explore and discover everything that Sudan’s Red Sea has to offer.

 

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