Natural Beauty in East Africa

East Africa is a land of amazement, and the combination of stunning scenery and several of the most majestic and fascinating animals on earth makes this area a mecca for nature lovers. Many of the visitors coming to the region do so for the opportunity to enjoy a safari and to spot animals like lions, elephants and rhinos, but there are also several other great sites worth visiting too. The coastal areas and the islands of East Africa offer a very different natural experience, but they also have plenty of places worth visiting.

The Historical Importance Of East Africa

In many ways, the challenging geography and natural barriers such as jungles and deserts helped much of East Africa to resist colonial influences for a period, but eventually the majority of the area became colonized by one of the European nations. The fertile soils were excellent for growing tea and coffee, while spices and mineral resources were also exploited.

This colonial influence has reduced dramatically during the twentieth century, with the majority of East Africa now made up of independent nations. While there is still significant strife and conflict in some areas, those places that do have important tourist locations tend to try and attract visitors and try and make themselves a peaceful and welcoming place for visitors, because of the wealth and foreign currency that tourism can bring into these countries.

Security And Safety When Visiting East Africa

The majority of tourist areas in East Africa are generally peaceful and safe places to visit, and while there are some areas that are known for petty crime such as pickpocketing, the danger to tourists is minimal. Some countries such as Somalia, Eritrea, Sudan and South Sudan are off the beaten track for visitors, and should be visited with caution. Most of the countries in East Africa are religious and quite conservative, so it is important to check up on local customs before traveling to these countries.

Dinder National Park, park, southeastern Sudan. The park lies in the clayish floodplain of the Dinder and Rahad rivers, at an elevation of 2,300 to 2,600 feet (700 to 800 metres). Established in 1935, it covers an area of 2,750 square mi (7,123 square km). Vegetation in the park consists of thornbush savanna in the north and woodland in the south; along the riverbanks there are palm or gallery forests and swampy areas. Wildlife includes giraffe, hartebeest, reedbuck, roan antelope, bushbuck, oribi, waterbuck, greater kudu, gazelle, dik-dik, buffalo, lion, and ostrich. Black rhinoceros, leopard, cheetah, elephant, hyena, and jackal are also occasionally found. The park can be reached by road fromKhartoum, a distance of 290 miles (470 km). Its headquarters are at Khartoum.

The annual rainfall in the Park ranges between 600-800mm and there are three major ecosystems: the riverine (Hyphaena thebaica, Acacia nilotica), the woodland (Acacia seyal, Balanites aegyptiaca), and the mayas and depressions. The mayas are oxbow lakes along the meandering rivers. They are subject to floods and contain green fodderand water up to the end of the dry season. The Park supports 27 large mammal species, bats and small mammals, more than 160 species of birds, 32 fish species, reptiles and amphibians. In addition there are about 58 species of shrubs and trees (Higher Council for Environment and Natural Resources, 2001).

Dinder is mainly and extensively made of Savannah grassland, woodland and riverine forests; with a few hills and highlands located along and near the Ethiopian border. The park has three ecosystems, each with its own plant and animal communities. The northern part is dominated by acacia seyal and balanites aegyptiaca savannah which merges with anogeissus – combretum woodlot. Along the Dinder river doom palm (hyphaena thebaica) are dominant. Palm trees have an important economic value in the cottage industry as they are used in the making of mats, baskets, brooms; and are also used for construction. Other trees abundantly found in Dinder include: acacia siberana and tamorindus indica. Along the banks of the river, reeds and tall wild sorghum grass grow.

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Posted on September 24, 2013, in Sudan life style and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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